Posts Tagged ‘Saskatchewan’

Harvest has started

Tuesday, August 9th, 2011

I saw the first combine of the season working on field peas today. I’m told that some red lentils are also being combined in the area. It’s amazing how quickly the heat has pushed crop maturity, especially on pulse crops. I started desiccating my large green lentils this evening so they might be ready for the combine in a week or so.

In most areas of Saskatchewan, harvest won’t start for a while yet, but in this region the first operations are underway. The extreme southwest corner of the province is usually the first to see harvest activity, but they had seeding delays from wet weather this spring. This pocket northwest of Swift Current had some of the earliest seeding with some crops going into the ground before the end of April.

There are still lots of spring cereal crops that are completely green, but there has been dramatic ripening in the early seeded field peas and lentils. An early harvest often means disappointing production, but the crops look pretty good. I haven’t heard any yield reports yet.

I’m Kevin Hursh.

Crop and weather update

Friday, June 10th, 2011

From Canola Council of Canada

Peace (B.C. and Alberta): Seeding is basically done but a few fields are being reseeded after another heavy frost in northern locations over the weekend. Growers wondering when to resume spraying after a frost can click here. Cool and wet conditions have slowed crop development, and have also slowed insect activity and weed spraying.  Rain in the southern Peace region helped alleviate crusting issues.

Alberta: Seeding is done in central Alberta and almost done in the south. Warm temperatures are needed to get canola growing. Soils in the south are cold and wet, which has kept sprayers off the field. Soils in the north are cold and dry. Cool temperatures have moved flea beetles down to stems and undersides of leaves. Reseeding is fairly common in north central regions after 2 or 3 successive frosts, including -6 C in some locations this past week. Alberta crop report.

Saskatchewan: Emerged canola needs warm weather to start rapid growth. The south needs a few dry days so growers can get on fields to spray. Many acres in the southeast will not get seeded and growers have a lot of weeds and volunteer canola to deal with before they get too big and set seed. The northwest needs rain to get canola growing and help it recover from frost. Saskatchewan crop report.

Manitoba: The final crop insurance deadline is June 20 for southwest Manitoba, where seeding is less than 10% complete for many growers. With up to 4” of rain again this past week, many unseeded fields will not get seeded. Some growers are still trying to broadcast with floaters or planes, and a few are considering leaving volunteer canola as a crop. Overall, western Manitoba is 40-50% seeded and eastern Manitoba is 60-70% seeded. Manitoba crop report.

Another year with unseeded acreage

Wednesday, June 1st, 2011

Farmers in southeastern Saskatchewan are in trouble. Only a limited amount of crop has been seeded, time is running out and rain continues to fall. The crop report that came out on May 26 estimated provincial seeding progress at 54 per cent as of May 23, up from just 23 in the report for the previous week. The five year average for May 23 is 72 per cent. At 54 per cent, progress is on par with the spring of 2010. But remember, last year saw millions of acres go unseeded in Saskatchewan. Whether the situation ends up as bad as last year remains to be seen. Certainly the geographic distribution of unseeded acres will be different this time. The problem is across the south and especially in the southeast. In the crop districts that include Estevan, Oxbow, Moosomin and Grenfell, seeding progress is estimated at only six to nine per cent. The crop district around Weyburn has only 19 per cent seeded. The next lowest is the crop district around Yorkton at 28 per cent, followed by Assiniboia in the south central region at 33 to 35 per cent. The southwest corner of the province is uncharacteristically wet and slow. Producers in the Maple Creek to Shaunavon area are often done seeding by the middle of May. This year, due to heavy snow over the winter and continual rains this spring, seeding is at only 37 per cent. Amazingly, there’s more seeding progress (39 per cent) in the crop district that includes Foam Lake and Wadena than there is in the southwest corner. The northern grain belt has had excellent seeding progress ranging from 62 per cent in the northeast corner around Hudson Bay and Tisdale to over 80 per cent west of North Battleford. Progress is actually well ahead of the five-year average across the north. Since the Ministry of Agriculture numbers are for the week ending May 23, progress is now well ahead of these numbers in many regions. Unfortunately, there has been limited progress in the regions that are furthest behind. For producers in the wet areas, it’s a time to nervously watch the weather forecasts and the calendar. The seeding window is closing quickly.

I’m Kevin Hursh.

Crop and weather update

Friday, May 27th, 2011

From Canola Council of Canada

Peace (B.C. and Alberta): Canola seeding ranges from half to two thirds complete in the east, to 95% complete in the west. Most areas had some rain in the past week, except for the far north. Fairly regular showers are the reason for slower seeding progress in the east.

Alberta: Seeding is progressing well. Some areas are nearly complete. Others need up to a week to wrap up. Rains fell across most of southern and central Alberta in the past week, with over 2” in some areas. Frost was widespread in central Alberta, with some areas reporting as low as -6 C. Alberta crop report.

Saskatchewan: Canola seeding is near complete in west and northeast regions. Parts of the southeast have not started seeding due to excess moisture and continuing rains. Growers there are looking at new crop insurance deadlines, which are June 1 for some areas. Frost hit the north canola growing region, with lowest lows around -6 C. Rains fell across the south, which was welcome in the southwest but not at all in the southeast. Saskatchewan crop report.

Manitoba: Canola seeding progress ranges from nothing done in parts of the southwest to maybe half done in the south central region. The provincial average is probably 15-20% but this is hard to pin down since seeding is so sporadic. Only the northwest corner escaped rain in the past week. Many areas had light frost. Manitoba crop report.

Crop and weather update

Wednesday, May 11th, 2011

From Canola Council of Canada

Peace (B.C. and Alberta): Some growers have started seeding, and most growers will start before the end of the week.

Alberta: Seeding is underway and the province looks set for a busy week in the fields. Alberta crop report.

Saskatchewan: Western Saskatchewan should see a lot of land seeded this week. Eastern Saskatchewan continues wet and is well behind the western region. Saskatchewan crop report.

Manitoba: Rains this week add to already very wet conditions. Many growers have not seeded anything, and general seeding is not likely to start for another 10 days or more. Manitoba crop report.

Crop and weather update

Monday, May 9th, 2011

From Canola Council

Peace (B.C. and Alberta): After good snowfall this winter, the Peace region has better soil moisture than it has had in years. Some peas are in the ground and canola seeding will start soon.

Alberta: A few growers in Southern Alberta have started seeding, but rain in the forecast could halt what has already been a very late start for this region. Central Alberta should see seeding kick off in a big way in the coming few days.

Saskatchewan: General seeding should start in Western Saskatchewan in the next few days. Eastern Saskatchewan is farther behind, but is also progressing. Fields that were cultivated last fall to help them dry out faster are warming up and getting green with weeds.

Manitoba: Western Manitoba got rain followed by snow over the weekend, setting seeding back 10 to 21 days for many growers. Eastern Manitoba did not get the same volume of rain, and despite flooding rivers, some fields will be ready to seed this week or early next week.

Seeding about to start

Monday, April 25th, 2011

This may come as a surprise to those still suffering from flooding, but if the weather holds, a bit of seeding will take place in Saskatchewan this week. The extreme southwest corner of the province is usually the first out of the gate. Many years, seeding is underway there by the middle of April. This year, the deep southwest is still wet. Areas around Shaunavon, Consul and Maple Creek had a pile of snow and it has been slow to leave. Producers who are often in full swing with their seeding by now won’t be rolling for a while. However, north of the TransCanada highway up to the South Saskatchewan River, there are areas where seeding will soon be feasible. Remnants of snow banks can still be seen in some tree rows and side hills. But, there are weeds popping up in the field and the frogs have started to croak at night. That shows the soil is warming up. If you avoid the sloughs, you can drive across a lot of fields. While field work won’t become general this week, in this pocket of southwest Saskatchewan, there are likely to be some producers who at least get a start on seeding.
I’m Kevin Hursh.

Record farm income in Sask.

Wednesday, March 2nd, 2011

Saskatchewan’s realized net farm income has been at an all time high for the past two years. In 2009, it was $1.6 billion and the latest estimate for 2010 is more than $1.7 billion. There are those who point out that adjusted for inflation, the highest net farm income was back in the early 70s when there were two years at over a billion dollars. That’s certainly true, but 2009 and 2010 are the highest in nominal terms. What’s more, we’ve eclipsed the net farm income of all the other provinces. Manitoba has been reasonable at $550 and then $400 million dollars. But Alberta has been particularly low at $264 million in 2009 and a mere $64 million in 2010. For 2011, Statistics Canada is calling for Alberta to improve to around $250 million based on stronger cattle and hog returns. Manitoba’s realized net farm income is expected to decline to $126 million. Here in Saskatchewan, a big drop is expected, down to $592 million, due mainly to lower program payments and an expected rise in operating expenses. If the projections are correct, Quebec will take over as the province with the highest realized net farm income for 2011.

I’m Kevin Hursh.

DynAgra, an independent Western Canada-based Company, is dedicated to providing growers with the tools to manage the risk and maximize the profitability of their farm business through the continued innovation of agricultural products and services. We are committed to developing and providing growers with the latest in precision agronomics, variable rate technology, soil fertility, crop protection, fertilizers, custom application and financial solutions.

Farmland price info

Monday, November 29th, 2010

Farmland prices in Saskatchewan continue to increase. The 2009 values have just been released by Statistics Canada. This is the average value of farmland and buildings in each province. The average value for Saskatchewan has increased to $498 an acre, up from $453 in 2008 and $408 an acre back in 2007. The last few years have seen increases of $40 to $50 per year. Prices been increasing since 1993, but the increases were much smaller until recent years. Land prices haven’t always increased. From 1982 until 1993, there was a steady decline. Back in 1982 the average price was $413 an acre. By 1993, it had dropped to $253 an acre. While the current average is $498 an acre, it should be noted that prime farming ground in the province has been selling for as high as $1,300 or even more per acre. It’s also important to note that average values in Saskatchewan continue to trail every other province. The 2009 average value in Ontario is $4,767 an acre – the highest in the country. Alberta is at $1,428. Even Manitoba is much higher than Saskatchewan at $833 an acre.

I’m Kevin Hursh.

DynAgra, an independent Western Canada-based Company, is dedicated to providing growers with the tools to manage the risk and maximize the profitability of their farm business through the continued innovation of agricultural products and services. We are committed to developing and providing growers with the latest in precision agronomics, variable rate technology, soil fertility, crop protection, fertilizers, custom application and financial solutions.

Record farm income in Saskatchewan

Thursday, November 25th, 2010

The latest farm income numbers from Statistics Canada show that 2008 and 2009 were record high years for farm income in Saskatchewan. In both years, realized net income on Saskatchewan farms topped $1.6 billion, the highest levels ever. For 2009, the realized net income from Saskatchewan represents half of the realized net income for the entire country. The next highest after Saskatchewan’s $1.6 billion is Quebec at about $874 million, followed by Manitoba at $553 million. Realized net farm income in Alberta was less than $264 million, while Ontario was a paltry $13 million. Statistics Canada also provides information on the total value of farm capital in each province. This is the total value of livestock, land, buildings and machinery. For 2009, Alberta leads the nation with a total value of farm capital that exceeds $89 billion. Next is Ontario at $72 billion.

Saskatchewan has more farmland than any other province, but it’s also the least expensive land in the country. As a result, Saskatchewan’s total value of farm capital comes out to $43.5 billion. Despite this lower value of farm capital, Saskatchewan has been eclipsing Alberta and Ontario on farm income levels, due largely to grain prices that have improved dramatically since the middle part of the decade.

I’m Kevin Hursh.

DynAgra, an independent Western Canada-based Company, is dedicated to providing growers with the tools to manage the risk and maximize the profitability of their farm business through the continued innovation of agricultural products and services. We are committed to developing and providing growers with the latest in precision agronomics, variable rate technology, soil fertility, crop protection, fertilizers, custom application and financial solutions.