Posts Tagged ‘rain’

Crop and Weather Update

Monday, June 27th, 2011

From Canola Council of Canada

Peace Region (B.C. and Alberta): Welcome rains of 2” to 5” fell across most of the region early this week. Rains bypassed the northern Peace region and fields in that area are experiencing some drought stress.

Alberta: Rain blanketed Alberta, with a few tenths to 2” in the south and an average of 2” in central regions. Some areas got 5” to 6”. Central Alberta needed the rain. Earliest canola is bolting. A few warm days would help crops advance quickly. Alberta crop report.

Saskatchewan: Rain fell across the province, ranging from 1/2” to 3” in the southwest, 2” to 5” across the north, and at least that much in the southeast. Dry areas welcomed the rain. The southeast didn’t need any, and some areas (Weyburn, for example) now face extreme flooding. Earliest crops are bolting. All crops would benefit from some heat. Saskatchewan crop report.

Manitoba: Rainfall varied from 1/4” in the east to 6.5” in the southwest where they didn’t need any rain at all. Many canola fields are under considerable moisture stress. The province needs a long stretch of warm days without rain. Manitoba crop report.

Rain and more rain

Thursday, June 23rd, 2011

The maps are always a bit behind and they aren’t always perfectly accurate for localized areas, but it’s still very interesting to follow the precipitation maps published by Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada. Just google “Drought Watch” and you’ll be able to find the website. As of the end of May, the central and northern grainbelt of Saskatchewan was well below normal springtime precipitation. In fact, from Saskatoon to North Battleford to Lloydminster and up to Meadow Lake, precipitation was less than 40 per cent of normal. Melfort and Tisdale were also below 40 per cent. The most recent maps give precipitation totals up until June 19 and the situation has changed dramatically. There are a few areas with 60 to 85 per cent of normal precipitation, but most of the central and northern grainbelt is now up to normal precipitation since April 1. Meanwhile, the area with more than double the normal springtime precip has expanded and includes Gravelbourg, Coronach, Weyburn, Estevan and over to Brandon. In fact, if you check the percentile map, this area is record wet. It’s never had more springtime precipitation since record keeping began.

I’m Kevin Hursh.

Another year with unseeded acreage

Wednesday, June 1st, 2011

Farmers in southeastern Saskatchewan are in trouble. Only a limited amount of crop has been seeded, time is running out and rain continues to fall. The crop report that came out on May 26 estimated provincial seeding progress at 54 per cent as of May 23, up from just 23 in the report for the previous week. The five year average for May 23 is 72 per cent. At 54 per cent, progress is on par with the spring of 2010. But remember, last year saw millions of acres go unseeded in Saskatchewan. Whether the situation ends up as bad as last year remains to be seen. Certainly the geographic distribution of unseeded acres will be different this time. The problem is across the south and especially in the southeast. In the crop districts that include Estevan, Oxbow, Moosomin and Grenfell, seeding progress is estimated at only six to nine per cent. The crop district around Weyburn has only 19 per cent seeded. The next lowest is the crop district around Yorkton at 28 per cent, followed by Assiniboia in the south central region at 33 to 35 per cent. The southwest corner of the province is uncharacteristically wet and slow. Producers in the Maple Creek to Shaunavon area are often done seeding by the middle of May. This year, due to heavy snow over the winter and continual rains this spring, seeding is at only 37 per cent. Amazingly, there’s more seeding progress (39 per cent) in the crop district that includes Foam Lake and Wadena than there is in the southwest corner. The northern grain belt has had excellent seeding progress ranging from 62 per cent in the northeast corner around Hudson Bay and Tisdale to over 80 per cent west of North Battleford. Progress is actually well ahead of the five-year average across the north. Since the Ministry of Agriculture numbers are for the week ending May 23, progress is now well ahead of these numbers in many regions. Unfortunately, there has been limited progress in the regions that are furthest behind. For producers in the wet areas, it’s a time to nervously watch the weather forecasts and the calendar. The seeding window is closing quickly.

I’m Kevin Hursh.

Crop and weather update

Friday, May 27th, 2011

From Canola Council of Canada

Peace (B.C. and Alberta): Canola seeding ranges from half to two thirds complete in the east, to 95% complete in the west. Most areas had some rain in the past week, except for the far north. Fairly regular showers are the reason for slower seeding progress in the east.

Alberta: Seeding is progressing well. Some areas are nearly complete. Others need up to a week to wrap up. Rains fell across most of southern and central Alberta in the past week, with over 2” in some areas. Frost was widespread in central Alberta, with some areas reporting as low as -6 C. Alberta crop report.

Saskatchewan: Canola seeding is near complete in west and northeast regions. Parts of the southeast have not started seeding due to excess moisture and continuing rains. Growers there are looking at new crop insurance deadlines, which are June 1 for some areas. Frost hit the north canola growing region, with lowest lows around -6 C. Rains fell across the south, which was welcome in the southwest but not at all in the southeast. Saskatchewan crop report.

Manitoba: Canola seeding progress ranges from nothing done in parts of the southwest to maybe half done in the south central region. The provincial average is probably 15-20% but this is hard to pin down since seeding is so sporadic. Only the northwest corner escaped rain in the past week. Many areas had light frost. Manitoba crop report.

Why is the malting barley price dropping?

Friday, December 17th, 2010

Malting barley supplies in Western Canada are limited due to the bad harvest. Meanwhile, continuous rains in Eastern Australia over the past three weeks have cut the Aussie supply of malting barley. So why is the Pool Return Outlook for malting barley continuing to drop? Shouldn’t the price be rising? In the latest PRO released yesterday, malting barley is down another dollar a tonne. Two-row with average Saskatchewan freight and handling deducted now has a PRO of only $3.96 a bushel. That’s not much of a premium over feed barley. In this case, the reduced supply of malting barley is hurting the pooled price. There’s a limited supply to market into the higher world prices. Lower prices locked in earlier in the year are accounting for a bigger and bigger percentage of the pool, dragging down projected value. The price outlook for next crop year is a lot brighter. I’ve heard of at least one company offering a Cash Plus price of $5.75 a bushel. Unfortunately, that contract does not have an Act of God clause. Hopefully, there will be more companies with Cash Plus offerings. There should be a desire by companies to lock in a malting barley supply for next year.

I’m Kevin Hursh.

DynAgra, an independent Western Canada-based Company, is dedicated to providing growers with the tools to manage the risk and maximize the profitability of their farm business through the continued innovation of agricultural products and services. We are committed to developing and providing growers with the latest in precision agronomics, variable rate technology, soil fertility, crop protection, fertilizers, custom application and financial solutions.

Crop quality takes a hit

Tuesday, August 31st, 2010

There is a wide range in quality over the limited amount of crop that’s been harvested. Within the lentil crop, a lot of disease and sprouting is evident, although there has also been some good quality harvested. With the weather this week, you have to think the quality of many crops is going to take a further hit. This is especially true on the eastern Prairies where there has been a lot of rain in the past couple of weeks and more rain is forecast. In addition to bleaching, sprouting and disease, the rain and cool weather is further delaying maturity. When the clouds finally clear, frost might not be far behind. It’s that time of year. The days are getting shorter and we can’t seem to get a sustained period of warm, dry weather. It’s been a difficult growing season and so far the same pattern is holding for harvest. We really need a repeat of last year’s abnormally hot and dry September. Otherwise the Saskatchewan crop is going to have below average quality as well as below normal quantity. I’m Kevin Hursh.

DynAgra, an independent Western Canada-based Company, is dedicated to providing growers with the tools to manage the risk and maximize the profitability of their farm business through the continued innovation of agricultural products and services. We are committed to developing and providing growers with the latest in precision agronomics, variable rate technology, soil fertility, crop protection, fertilizers, custom application and financial solutions.

Leaf disease robbing your yield?

Thursday, June 24th, 2010

With the wet soils and large amounts of rain that have swept through Alberta, leaf disease in cereal crops has come to the forefront. Growers have been bringing barley and wheat in for me to look at and they are full of disease. Tan spot and net blotch have been two of the diseases I have seen in the Standard area. 

 
Leaf Disease

Leaf Disease

The plant disease triangle is complete with the perfect environment and the pathogens are present and the host crops are susceptible. Scout your fields early and right until flag leaf to watch for those yield robbing leaf diseases.

Disease Triangle

Disease Triangle

Yours in crop protection,

Eric Brodie

DynAgra, an independent Western Canada-based Company, is dedicated to providing growers with the tools to manage the risk and maximize the profitability of their farm business through the continued innovation of agricultural products and services. We are committed to developing and providing growers with the latest in precision agronomics, variable rate technology, soil fertility, crop protection, fertilizers, custom application and financial solutions.

How high’s the water?

Friday, May 28th, 2010

April and May have seen an unprecedented amount of rain over most of Saskatchewan and there’s more rain falling. Precipitation maps compiled by Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada show most of the grainbelt has already had more than two times normal precipitation this spring. Much of central Saskatchewan is at a record high. Only the southeast corner of the province is about normal for springtime precip. Everywhere else is above. The area of heaviest precipitation is within the borders of Saskatchewan. The amounts taper off as you move into Alberta and Manitoba. In this week’s crop report, the Saskatchewan Ministry of Agriculture is rating topsoil moisture on cropland as 54 per cent adequate and 46 per cent surplus. The surplus rating will rise as the rain continues to fall. The delayed seeding will no doubt cause some alterations in seeding intentions. There may be fewer lentil acres go in the ground and durum acreage could fall even further. On the other side of the coin, it’s reasonable to now expect more barley acres as well as more canola. It will take a while to get a handle on the magnitude of any acreage shifts. I’m Kevin Hursh.

DynAgra, an independent Western Canada-based Company, is dedicated to providing growers with the tools to manage the risk and maximize the profitability of their farm business through the continued innovation of agricultural products and services. We are committed to developing and providing growers with the latest in precision agronomics, variable rate technology, soil fertility, crop protection, fertilizers, custom application and financial solutions.

More weather surprises still to come?

Friday, July 3rd, 2009

It has been a whacky spring and summer for weather. While the western Prairies are suffering from drought, there continues to be too much rain in parts of Manitoba. On Sunday and Monday, areas east of Winnipeg received a huge amount of rain – as much as 5.5 inches near the community of St. Joseph. There’s standing water in the fields. Meanwhile, in parts of Alberta, there have been reports of frost in recent days. According to the Canola Watch report from the Canola Council of Canada, temperatures of minus one were reported near Beaverlodge, Leduc and Ryley on Sunday night and Monday morning. Grain traders follow weather and crop reports very closely during the growing season. The trade factors in information as it becomes available, but the way the growing season has been going, you have to wonder if there could be some major production surprises still to come. Has the true extent of the drought been factored into production estimates? Crops are late. What if there’s a widespread, earlier-than-normal killing frost? Producers are becoming reluctant to part with grain because production prospects seem very uncertain this year. I’m Kevin Hursh.

www.hursh.ca

Kevin Hursh, PAg, CAC

Rocky start to growing season

Friday, June 5th, 2009

For early June, crop development is was behind where it should be. The crop report released yesterday by the Ministry of Agriculture says 60 to 80 per cent of Saskatchewan crops are behind normal in development. In the areas I’ve travelled, a lot of crop is yet to emerge. Over the past couple days I’ve travelled from Saskatoon to the Calgary area and back. West Central Saskatchewan is the driest part of the province and conditions aren’t pretty. There are very few crops with decent germination and development. In a large percentage of seeded fields, there’s no crop emergence that you can see from the road. In many other fields, there are only faint patches of green. A lot of the native pasture has little or no new growth. Pasture that’s seen significant grazing pressure is about as bare as a city sidewalk. Usually by early June post emergent herbicide application is in full swing. Not this year. Crops everywhere are late and the dry zones are expanding. Provincially, most crops are still rated as fair to good. In West Central Saskatchewan, a large percentage of the crop is rated as poor or very poor. Crop ratings in every region are going to decline without significant rain. I’m Kevin Hursh.

 www.hursh.ca

Kevin Hursh, PAg, CAC