Posts Tagged ‘Manitoba’

Issues of the week

Thursday, August 18th, 2011

From Canola Council of Canada

Lygus populations continue to be high and exceed thresholds in parts of Alberta and Manitoba. Many young nymphs are being found and crops are nearing the end of the susceptible stage so management decisions are being made on a field-by-field basis. Pay attention to pre-harvest intervals (time between application and cutting) this late in the growing season. Once a crop is within 7 days of being swathed, no insecticides can be applied. Click here for more information on product pre-harvest intervals.

Hail events throughout the growing season in parts of Alberta and northwestern Saskatchewan have resulted in significant regrowth as fields recover. Many fields now have two or three distinct stages (e.g. some plants beginning to show signs of seed colour change while others are still in full flower) making time-to-swath decisions tricky. No blanket recommendation can be given and growers will have to evaluate on a field-by-field basis.

As we pass the middle of August, the length of frost free days remaining in the growing season comes to mind. Late crops and late stages within fields are being assessed for production potential to help with management decisions, such as insect control and swath timing.

Crop and weather update

Friday, June 10th, 2011

From Canola Council of Canada

Peace (B.C. and Alberta): Seeding is basically done but a few fields are being reseeded after another heavy frost in northern locations over the weekend. Growers wondering when to resume spraying after a frost can click here. Cool and wet conditions have slowed crop development, and have also slowed insect activity and weed spraying.  Rain in the southern Peace region helped alleviate crusting issues.

Alberta: Seeding is done in central Alberta and almost done in the south. Warm temperatures are needed to get canola growing. Soils in the south are cold and wet, which has kept sprayers off the field. Soils in the north are cold and dry. Cool temperatures have moved flea beetles down to stems and undersides of leaves. Reseeding is fairly common in north central regions after 2 or 3 successive frosts, including -6 C in some locations this past week. Alberta crop report.

Saskatchewan: Emerged canola needs warm weather to start rapid growth. The south needs a few dry days so growers can get on fields to spray. Many acres in the southeast will not get seeded and growers have a lot of weeds and volunteer canola to deal with before they get too big and set seed. The northwest needs rain to get canola growing and help it recover from frost. Saskatchewan crop report.

Manitoba: The final crop insurance deadline is June 20 for southwest Manitoba, where seeding is less than 10% complete for many growers. With up to 4” of rain again this past week, many unseeded fields will not get seeded. Some growers are still trying to broadcast with floaters or planes, and a few are considering leaving volunteer canola as a crop. Overall, western Manitoba is 40-50% seeded and eastern Manitoba is 60-70% seeded. Manitoba crop report.

Crop and weather update

Friday, May 27th, 2011

From Canola Council of Canada

Peace (B.C. and Alberta): Canola seeding ranges from half to two thirds complete in the east, to 95% complete in the west. Most areas had some rain in the past week, except for the far north. Fairly regular showers are the reason for slower seeding progress in the east.

Alberta: Seeding is progressing well. Some areas are nearly complete. Others need up to a week to wrap up. Rains fell across most of southern and central Alberta in the past week, with over 2” in some areas. Frost was widespread in central Alberta, with some areas reporting as low as -6 C. Alberta crop report.

Saskatchewan: Canola seeding is near complete in west and northeast regions. Parts of the southeast have not started seeding due to excess moisture and continuing rains. Growers there are looking at new crop insurance deadlines, which are June 1 for some areas. Frost hit the north canola growing region, with lowest lows around -6 C. Rains fell across the south, which was welcome in the southwest but not at all in the southeast. Saskatchewan crop report.

Manitoba: Canola seeding progress ranges from nothing done in parts of the southwest to maybe half done in the south central region. The provincial average is probably 15-20% but this is hard to pin down since seeding is so sporadic. Only the northwest corner escaped rain in the past week. Many areas had light frost. Manitoba crop report.

Assiniboine River Flooding

Friday, May 20th, 2011

Here are some pictures of how severe the flooding in Manitoba is:

This is the Assiniboine River Bridge on Highway 34.

The water is usually 15 feet below the bridge.

Looks more like a lake than a river!

Crop and weather report

Wednesday, May 18th, 2011

From Canola Council of Canada

Peace (B.C. and Alberta): Canola seeding is around 25% complete across the region and progressing well. Warm temperatures and high winds have dried out the topsoil, and many growers are seeding deeper to hit moisture.

Alberta: Canola seeding progressed quickly over the past week and is over 50% complete in the south and around 25% complete in central Alberta, on average. Strong winds have dried out the top inch of soil and many fields could use a rain to help with emergence. Alberta crop report.

Saskatchewan: Seeding is advancing quickly in the west and north. Areas from Unity to Lloydminster and around Moose Jaw are furthest ahead, with about 50% of canola acres seeded. Eastern Saskatchewan, except for spots hit by a large rain storm in the past week, is drying nicely and well underway. Saskatchewan crop report.

Manitoba: Areas furthest advanced have about 5% of crops seeded, but it could be a busy week of seeding ahead. Sunny and warm days are forecast for the next week or so, and fields are drying out enough to support seeding equipment. Manitoba crop report.

Crop and weather update

Wednesday, May 11th, 2011

From Canola Council of Canada

Peace (B.C. and Alberta): Some growers have started seeding, and most growers will start before the end of the week.

Alberta: Seeding is underway and the province looks set for a busy week in the fields. Alberta crop report.

Saskatchewan: Western Saskatchewan should see a lot of land seeded this week. Eastern Saskatchewan continues wet and is well behind the western region. Saskatchewan crop report.

Manitoba: Rains this week add to already very wet conditions. Many growers have not seeded anything, and general seeding is not likely to start for another 10 days or more. Manitoba crop report.

Crop and weather update

Monday, May 9th, 2011

From Canola Council

Peace (B.C. and Alberta): After good snowfall this winter, the Peace region has better soil moisture than it has had in years. Some peas are in the ground and canola seeding will start soon.

Alberta: A few growers in Southern Alberta have started seeding, but rain in the forecast could halt what has already been a very late start for this region. Central Alberta should see seeding kick off in a big way in the coming few days.

Saskatchewan: General seeding should start in Western Saskatchewan in the next few days. Eastern Saskatchewan is farther behind, but is also progressing. Fields that were cultivated last fall to help them dry out faster are warming up and getting green with weeds.

Manitoba: Western Manitoba got rain followed by snow over the weekend, setting seeding back 10 to 21 days for many growers. Eastern Manitoba did not get the same volume of rain, and despite flooding rivers, some fields will be ready to seed this week or early next week.

More and more regulation

Friday, October 1st, 2010

The province of Manitoba has announced this it is committing $400,000 for the establishment of a new Agricultural Premises Identification program. This is part of the national livestock traceability system.

An agricultural premise is defined as a parcel of land on any part of which animals, plants or food are grown, kept, assembled or disposed of. The idea of the premises database is to use it as a tool for food safety issues and emergencies, and also to support trade and market access. Manitoba is starting with the collection of information on livestock and poultry production locations. All provinces are responsible for developing a premises identification database. I understand what these programs are trying to accomplish, but pretty soon producers will need to have a better handle on the location of their cows than their kids. You’d hope that domestic and international consumers would appreciate the effort within initiatives such as premise ID. Sadly, I’ll bet most consumers don’t know, don’t understand and don’t care.

 I’m Kevin Hursh.

DynAgra, an independent Western Canada-based Company, is dedicated to providing growers with the tools to manage the risk and maximize the profitability of their farm business through the continued innovation of agricultural products and services. We are committed to developing and providing growers with the latest in precision agronomics, variable rate technology, soil fertility, crop protection, fertilizers, custom application and financial solutions.

Record book precipitation

Wednesday, August 25th, 2010

With the growing season drawing to a close, the accumulated precipitation maps tell an amazing tale. Since April 1, there has been a record high amount of precipitation over about 40 per cent of the Saskatchewan grain belt. This record spills over into the east central region of Alberta and some northern parts of the Manitoba grain belt, but the majority of the record high area is in Saskatchewan. According to the maps published by Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, the entire Saskatchewan grain belt has had above normal growing season precip. In the Prairies as a whole, the only area below normal is the Peace River region of Alberta. In fact, most of the Prairies have exceeded normal growing season precipitation by more than 120 mm, which is nearly five inches. The rainfall totals are incredible. Most parts of Saskatchewan and Manitoba have received over 400 mm. That’s over 16 inches. Many areas are over 18 inches and some are over 20. The traditionally dry regions are happy about the recharge of ground and surface water. Areas that often suffer from too much rain are wondering when their sloughs and lakes will ever recede. To view precipitation maps, just Google “Drought Watch” and go to the current maps of the Prairie region. I’m Kevin Hursh.

DynAgra, an independent Western Canada-based Company, is dedicated to providing growers with the tools to manage the risk and maximize the profitability of their farm business through the continued innovation of agricultural products and services. We are committed to developing and providing growers with the latest in precision agronomics, variable rate technology, soil fertility, crop protection, fertilizers, custom application and financial solutions.

Diamondback moth issues

Friday, May 28th, 2010

Adult diamondback moths have already been found in pheromone-baited traps in several areas of Manitoba and Alberta. This does indicate an early arrival of the moths. Scott Meers, insect management specialist with Alberta Agriculture, says the early arrival means we’ll probably have issues as the season progresses. Listen to his interview at Alberta Agriculture’s website. Be prepared to watch closely later in the season when the next generation of larvae emerge and start feeding.

DynAgra, an independent Western Canada-based Company, is dedicated to providing growers with the tools to manage the risk and maximize the profitability of their farm business through the continued innovation of agricultural products and services. We are committed to developing and providing growers with the latest in precision agronomics, variable rate technology, soil fertility, crop protection, fertilizers, custom application and financial solutions.