Posts Tagged ‘Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada’

Rotations for yield

Wednesday, December 21st, 2011

From Canola Council of Canada

A recent Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada study found that growing peas and, to a lesser degree, lentils the year prior to canola can enhance canola yield. Study results showed a significant and consistent yield advantage when canola was grown on pea compared to wheat stubble. The 2-year study also found that growing canola on canola resulted in statistically significant reductions in canola yield at Beaverlodge and Lethbridge. Results from other locations also showed trends towards reduced canola yields but differences were not statistically significant.

Crop insurance data from Manitoba and Alberta for 2000-10 provides more evidence that canola on canola will reduce yields. In a presentation from 2011, Murray Hartman, Alberta Agriculture canola specialist, and Anastasia Kubinec, Manitoba Agriculture oilseed specialist, used crop insurance data to show that canola on canola stubble yielded 15% to 20% lower, on average, than canola on wheat and barley stubble. Not only that, but the crop insurance data showed that yields for canola on canola are actually declining.

Manitoba crop insurance data show that any break between canola crops is better for yield than continuous canola.

Manitoba crop insurance data show that from 1998-2007 canola on canola yielded 80% of canola on hard red spring wheat.

Government of Canada Invests in Green Agriculture Research

Tuesday, December 13th, 2011

Winnipeg, Manitoba, December 9, 2011 - Canadian farmers will benefit from a partnership involving the Government of Canada, industry and universities across Canada to boost producer profitability through green agriculture technologies. Today, the Honourable Vic Toews, Minister of Public Safety and Regional Minister for Manitoba, on behalf of Agricultural Minister Gerry Ritz, announced an investment of nearly $3 million to the University of Manitoba to study cost-effective greenhouse gas mitigation practices for the cattle sector.

“Our Government’s top priority is the economy, and Canada’s agriculture industry plays a vital role in helping to keep our economy strong,” said Minister Toews. “This project will help the agriculture industry improve its environmental performance while benefiting our economy and ensuring Canadian farmers stay competitive in the global marketplace.”

The University of Manitoba will use the investment to study greenhouse gas-related effects in three priority areas: converting crops from perennial to annual grasslands, long-term crop rotations of 10 years, and allowing cattle to graze during the winter rather than keeping them in a confined area. Results of this research will lead to the development of new beneficial management practices (BMPs) that will have a substantial impact on reducing greenhouse gas emissions in the cattle sector. Farmers who adopt these new BMPs can also benefit economically from improved feeding efficiency because two to 12 per cent of the energy of feed consumed by livestock is lost as a greenhouse gas.

“This investment will ensure our world-class innovators at the University of Manitoba will be able to explore new methods to reduce greenhouse gases which will have economic as well as environmental benefits,” said President and Vice-Chancellor David Barnard. “We welcome this partnership and thank the Government of Canada for supporting the work of our outstanding researchers.”

Funding for this project is through the Agricultural Greenhouse Gases Program (AAGP), a five-year, $27-million initiative that focuses on the development of on-farm greenhouse gas mitigation technologies. The AGGP will provide funding to various partners across Canada to investigate innovative mechanisms, tools and approaches to provide real solutions for the agriculture sector.

The AGGP represents Canada’s initial contribution to the Global Research Alliance, an international network of more than 30 member-countries that will coordinate and increase agricultural research on greenhouse gas mitigation and make new mitigation technologies and beneficial management practices available to farmers. For more information on the Global Research Alliance, visit www.globalresearchalliance.org/

For more information, media may contact:

Media Relations
Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada
Ottawa, Ontario
613-773-7972
1-866-345-7972

Meagan Murdoch
Director of Communications
The Office of the Honourable Gerry Ritz
613-773-1059

Food Tube

Thursday, October 6th, 2011

Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada has come up with some audience friendly videos depicting the history of our food. They’re an interesting tool to reach a broader audience. Take a look and let us know what you think!

Wheat Midge Prediction Correct

Friday, July 22nd, 2011

As Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada predicted, wheat midge is a problem in southern Alberta this year. 
We’re seeing above average counts of them to the point where crop destruction is a possibility.  

To monitor the pests, take the following precautions courtesy of Alberta Agriculture and Rural Development:

Careful, regular monitoring of wheat fields between heading and flowering is necessary both to identify a wheat midge infestation and to take the appropriate action.

Research indicates that wheat heads are most susceptible to damage when egg laying occurs during heading (Figure 5). Kernel damage due to wheat midge declines by 15 to 25 fold between later stages of heading and early flowering or anthesis (first yellow anthers appear on wheat head). Therefore, fields should be inspected daily from the time wheat heads emerge from the boot leaf until anthers are visible on the heads.

Favourable weather

Monday, April 18th, 2011

in many parts of Saskatchewan and the worst may be yet to come. However, we’ve actually been lucky with the weather over the past couple months. Temperatures throughout March were much colder than normal, slowing the snow melt. That has continued into April with most days cooler than average for this time of year. The cool weather means a late spring, but it has probably prevented some damage. Precipitation has also been kind to most of the province. Precipitation maps published by Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada show that over the past month, only southern regions of Saskatchewan have received above normal precipitation. The highest precipitation has been southwest of Swift Current and south of Gravelbourg. The rest of the Saskatchewan grain belt has had below normal precipitation since the middle of March. Saturated areas on the east side of the province could easily have received another one or two inches of moisture and that would have exasperated the problems. It may be difficult to count blessings in areas where most of the landscape is covered with water, but without this favourable weather, the problems could be even worse.

I’m Kevin Hursh.

 

GM wheat story is wrong

Wednesday, April 6th, 2011

A media story has been circulating that the National Research Council’s Plant Biotechnology Institute in Saskatoon plans to develop genetically modified wheat. The story is making the rounds and drawing fire from those opposed to genetic modification, but according to the top people at the National Research Council, the story is just plain wrong. They state unequivocally that GM wheat is not an objective for their wheat program. The NRC is working with Canadian wheat breeders from Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, the University’s Crop Development Centre and other public institutions to help them develop new varieties. The NRC provides technical support for the breeding programs but says that only technologies acceptable to the marketplace are used. The NRC also says that it will work closely with producers, breeders and the organizations involved in the registration and marketing of Canadian wheat to ensure varieties developed are consistent with market needs and priorities. GM wheat is highly contentious, but since we’re in the midst of a federal election campaign, the NRC can’t proactively communicate with the media. That’s why they haven’t fired out a news release to set the record straight.

I’m Kevin Hursh.

DynAgra, an independent Western Canada-based Company, is dedicated to providing growers with the tools to manage the risk and maximize the profitability of their farm business through the continued innovation of agricultural products and services. We are committed to developing and providing growers with the latest in precision agronomics, variable rate technology, soil fertility, crop protection, fertilizers, custom application and financial solutions.

Seeded acreage estimates

Wednesday, March 16th, 2011

Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada has come out with its latest market forecast for grains, oilseeds and specialty crops. The forecast includes an estimate of this year’s seeded acreage and their numbers generally look quite plausible, assuming there isn’t a major acreage that has to go unseeded. The biggest acreage drop is forecast on lentils, down 22 per cent, with most of that coming from a drop in red lentils. Mustard is expected to be down 12 per cent, with field peas down 7 per cent. The biggest percentage increase in acres is expected on flax. Ag Canada is calling for flaxseed to recover most of last year’s losses with a 70 per cent increase in acreage. The next biggest increase is expected on durum at 28 per cent, followed closely by oats at 27 per cent. A 12 percent increase is forecast for canaryseed. That crop is looking at an extremely tight stocks to use ratio after last year’s small production. There has been a great deal of speculation over canola acreage. Ag Canada is predicting a 10 per cent increase. That would be a new record of 18.5 million acres. Some analysts have been even more bullish on canola acres, but the price is down about $2 a bushel from the peak.

 I’m Kevin Hursh.

DynAgra, an independent Western Canada-based Company, is dedicated to providing growers with the tools to manage the risk and maximize the profitability of their farm business through the continued innovation of agricultural products and services. We are committed to developing and providing growers with the latest in precision agronomics, variable rate technology, soil fertility, crop protection, fertilizers, custom application and financial solutions.

Acreage and price predictions

Friday, February 4th, 2011

Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada has come out with new crop acreage and price forecasts for all the significant grains, oilseeds and specialty crops. On some crops, the Ag Canada analysis is calling for big acreage swings. For canola, the prediction is an acreage increase of 10 per cent. While that would be a new record, some analysts are expecting even more canola. A big factor will be how much land is too wet to seed this spring. On flax, the seeded acreage increase is predicted to be a whopping 70 per cent. Of course, acreage was down dramatically in 2010, so this would put flax acreage at closer to normal. The acreage increase in oats is pegged at 27 per cent due to improved prices. Ag Canada is also predicting a recovery in durum acreage, up 28 per cent, due to sharply higher prices and a lowering of carryover stocks. The Canadian Wheat Board hasn’t come out with its new crop price forecasts yet, but Ag Canada is calling for a slight increase in the durum pool return in the upcoming crop year as compared to this crop year. Meanwhile, the pool return for spring wheat is expected to drop by 6 percent in the upcoming crop year. Incredibly, the pool return for malting barley is also predicted to be lower in the upcoming year. I’m Kevin Hursh.

DynAgra, an independent Western Canada-based Company, is dedicated to providing growers with the tools to manage the risk and maximize the profitability of their farm business through the continued innovation of agricultural products and services. We are committed to developing and providing growers with the latest in precision agronomics, variable rate technology, soil fertility, crop protection, fertilizers, custom application and financial solutions.

Beware of weather stats

Monday, January 24th, 2011

The precipitation maps published by Agriculture Canada are widely used, but here’s a case that makes you wonder about the accuracy. Since the end of October, the maps show that Regina has had normal to a bit below normal precipitation. Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada’s National Agroclimate Information Service is also cited as the source for the percentage of normal stats used at the back of The Western Producer. The latest issue of the paper lists Regina at 80 per cent of normal since November 1. However, Regina residents are talking about the mountain of snow they’ve had. Last week, The Regina LeaderPost ran a story quoting Environment Canada as saying that Regina has had a record amount of snow since the end of October. The 120.5 cm surpasses the previous record set back in 1973-74. It is possible that the snowfall this winter has had less water content than usual, but it seems improbable that Regina has had record snowfall and below normal precipitation. There is a disclaimer which says the Ag Canada maps may not be accurate for all regions due to data availability and data errors. There certainly appears to be an error in this case.

I’m Kevin Hursh.

DynAgra, an independent Western Canada-based Company, is dedicated to providing growers with the tools to manage the risk and maximize the profitability of their farm business through the continued innovation of agricultural products and services. We are committed to developing and providing growers with the latest in precision agronomics, variable rate technology, soil fertility, crop protection, fertilizers, custom application and financial solutions.

American canola acreage booms

Tuesday, November 30th, 2010

Producers in the United States grew a record amount of canola this year. A report from Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada lists American canola area at nearly 3.8 million acres. That’s an amazing 84 per cent increase from the previous year. About 87 per cent of the canola area was centered in North Dakota, with Oklahoma becoming the number two producing state. While the U.S. had 3.8 million acres, over 16 million acres were seeded in Canada, with over seven million acres in Saskatchewan. So the American acreage is significant, but not in the same order of magnitude as north of the border. Ag Canada says the American shift to canola is attributed to improved returns for the crop as compared to lower wheat prices for the past two years. As well, fusarium has been difficult to control in wheat crops in the Red River Valley. A big chunk of that American canola crop is expected to find its way north to service the recently constructed crush facilities located in eastern Saskatchewan where excess moisture decreased local canola production. Ironically, the U.S. is Canada’s largest customer for canola oil and the world’s largest importer of canola oil.

I’m Kevin Hursh.

DynAgra, an independent Western Canada-based Company, is dedicated to providing growers with the tools to manage the risk and maximize the profitability of their farm business through the continued innovation of agricultural products and services. We are committed to developing and providing growers with the latest in precision agronomics, variable rate technology, soil fertility, crop protection, fertilizers, custom application and financial solutions.